architectureofdoom:


reforester:

Timothy Allen

posted on 14.06.25

sanatkaravani:

Masuleh  İran

sanatkaravani:

Masuleh  İran

posted on 14.02.13

whitelion945:

crescentmoon06:

Nevsehir, Central Anatolia, Turkey

you have to go there before you die…at least one time…

whitelion945:

crescentmoon06:

Nevsehir, Central Anatolia, Turkey

you have to go there before you die…at least one time…

posted on 14.01.20

awkwardsituationist:

the korowai tribe, who live in the hot and humid rain forests of #west papua, communally build homes entirely by hand, some as high as 35 meters off the ground. they are large enough house a dozen, and offer better ventilation and protection from insects and ground flooding. photos by george steinmetz. video on bbc human plane

posted on 14.01.14

ratak-monodosico:

Village on the Bank of the Niger River | Mali (via deskribe)

ratak-monodosico:

Village on the Bank of the Niger River | Mali (via deskribe)

posted on 13.12.03

posted on 13.09.25

propaedeuticist:

roof-streets of Masuleh, Iran

(Source: propaedeuticist)

posted on 13.06.12

architectureofdoom:

A Tuareg village in the Ubari area, Libya

architectureofdoom:

A Tuareg village in the Ubari area, Libya

posted on 13.02.23

evysinspirations:


Burkina Faso, Tiebele (by a2portfolio)

evysinspirations:

Burkina Faso, Tiebele (by a2portfolio)

posted on 13.01.21

architectureofdoom:

Brikiti Village, Papua New Guinea

architectureofdoom:

Brikiti Village, Papua New Guinea

(Source: productlaneevol)

posted on 13.01.02

propaedeuticist:

Cliff Settlements of Canyon de Chelly

(Source: propaedeuticist)

posted on 12.07.26

icancauseaconstellation:

The Wind Catchers of Hyderabad 1928 - Photo from the book “Architecture without Architects” by Bernard Rudofsky.

The city of Hyderabad in the Sindh province of Pakistan was once dominated by a roofscape of towering wind catchers, or “bad-gir”, as they were known locally.  These fixed wind scoops would provide ventilation to the whole household in the hot summer days. The heating of the chimney would cause cool air to be drawn from high up and would then be channeled through the rooms and out the front door. This method had been in use in the city for over five hundred years, but has now mostly been replaced by mechanical air conditioning with the chimneys being used to install satellite dishes.

(Source: catrinastewart)

posted on 12.07.09

catrinastewart:

Shabono structures by the Yanomami

From southern Venezuela and northern Brazil, the Yanomami built Shabonos as temporary dwellings for the whole community. Built using thatched palm leaves and wood these structures were built in clearings in the jungle. Each family would have their own personal area within the Shabono. 

posted on 12.07.01

catrinastewart:

Ma-Adan - Iraq

 The marsh dwellers have populated the Edenic wetlands for almost 5000 years. They were an almost completely self sufficient community with the marshes producing everything they needed to survive. Sturdy reeds reaching 20 feet became raw material for homes, baskets and boats, while tender reed shoots provided plentiful forage for water buffalo, who provided milk and dung, used as fuel for fires.

The marsh-dwelling people who in the 1950’s numbered about half a million people, have now dwindled to as few as 20,000 in Iraq. The Edenic wetlands that once gave refuge to a rich variety of wildlife have become lifeless, nearly waterless, salt-encrusted mudflats, since Saddam ordered the water source to be cut off just before he lost power. Today the Eden Again Project is attempting to release water back into the marshes, with the hope that the communities will return to their original site. 


posted on 12.06.29

johnny-remember-me:

“Propped by rubble, logs, and faith, a family compound at Yenndouma, Mali, clings to a rock face.” (National Geographic, 1969)

johnny-remember-me:

“Propped by rubble, logs, and faith, a family compound at Yenndouma, Mali, clings to a rock face.” (National Geographic, 1969)

posted on 12.03.08

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