ediblegardensla:

Growing eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and more in a garden house in Laurel Canyon.

ediblegardensla:

Growing eggplant, tomatoes, peppers and more in a garden house in Laurel Canyon.

posted on 14.08.17

mobylosangelesarchitecture:

when i was growing up in new york and connecticut i imagined california as looking like this. palm trees and architecture that looked nothing like the center hall colonials of connecticut or the tenements and skyscrapers of nyc.

and then when i first started coming to l.a i was amazed that this was a CITY but that people primarily lived in houses. and granted, many of the houses in l.a are kind of ugly and beige.

but then there are these perfect little jewel box mid century houses, reminding me of my post-adolescent l.a/california visions. and i guess one could argue that architecturally these mcm houses aren’t as arbitrary as norman castles or swiss chalet in the desert.

i mean, architecture like this opens itself to the outdoors but keeps the sun at bay when necessary. and it has the quasi-privacy screen, sort of saying ‘well, we like our privacy, but it’s ok if you peek a little bit’. the paradox of exhibitionist privacy.

-moby

posted on 14.07.16

mobylosangelesarchitecture:

i was out hiking today and i came across this perfect little a-frame house.

whenever i see perfect little a-frame houses i think of record producers in the mid 70’s reading about est and sitting in the hot-tub thinking about how best to record background vocals for the doobie brothers.

they seem quintessentially californian, the perfect home in which to make lentil stew for robert plant and melanie. which is odd. odd because with their super pitched roofs they’re designed for alpine climates where it snows 8 months out of the year. further re-inforcing the idea that almost all architectural vernacular in southern california is arbitrary. awesome, but arbitrary.

swiss chalets in a place where it never snows? down the street from normal castles and center hall new england colonials?

delirious los angeles.

-moby

posted on 14.07.16

Hollywood - 1960

Hollywood - 1960

posted on 14.05.03

midcenturymodernfreak:

1961 Fairhaven Tract Eichler Homes Model LJ-124 | Architects: A. Quincy Jones & Frederick E. Emmons | Orange, CA | Photo: Jason Schmidt | Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. - Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

1961 Fairhaven Tract Eichler Homes Model LJ-124 | Architects: A. Quincy Jones & Frederick E. Emmons | Orange, CA | Photo: Jason Schmidt | Courtesy Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. - Via

posted on 14.03.18

midcenturymodernfreak:

1960 Stahl House Model (Case Study House No. 22) | Architect: Pierre Koenig Los Angeles, CA -  Via

midcenturymodernfreak:

1960 Stahl House Model (Case Study House No. 22) | Architect: Pierre Koenig Los Angeles, CA -  Via

posted on 14.03.06

posted on 14.03.05

alexainslie:

California, 1940.

alexainslie:

California, 1940.

(Source: natgeofound)

posted on 14.02.20

posted on 14.01.12

cabbagerose:

hayvenhurst folie, encino, ca/new theme
via: newtheme

cabbagerose:

hayvenhurst folie, encino, ca/new theme

via: newtheme

posted on 13.10.01

midcenturymodernfreak:

Another Look at an Historic House | Part 1

1932 VDL House aka Neutra Research House | Architect: Richard Neutra (& son Dion Neutra) | 2300 Silver Lake Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039 - Via

posted on 13.09.07

memoriastoica:

Dodger Stadium construction in three stages.

Circa 1960.

posted on 13.09.05

inothernews:

Via Bloomberg Businessweek:

Almost a year after Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla Motors (TSLA) and SpaceX, first floated the idea of a superfast mode of transportation, he has finally revealed the details: a solar-powered, city-to-city elevated transit system that could take passengers and cars from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 30 minutes.  In typical Musk fashion, the Hyperloop, as he calls it, immediately poses a challenge to the status quo—in this case, California’s $70 billion high-speed train that has been knocked by Musk and others as too expensive, too slow, and too impractical.
In Musk’s vision, the Hyperloop would transport people via aluminum pods enclosed inside of steel tubes.  He describes the design as looking like a shotgun with the tubes running side by side for most of the journey and closing the loop at either end. These tubes would be mounted on columns 50 to 100 yards apart, and the pods inside would travel up to 800 miles per hour. Some of this Musk has hinted at before; he now adds that pods could ferry cars as well as people. “You just drive on, and the pod departs,” Musk told Bloomberg Businessweek in his first interview about the Hyperloop.
… Musk has built his entrepreneurial career attacking businesses he deems inefficient or uninspiring. He co-founded PayPal in a bid to shake up the banking industry, then used the fortune he made selling the startup to eBay to fund equally ambitious efforts in transportation. Tesla Motors, for example, has created the highest-performing, highest-rated all-electric car and a complementary network of charging stations scattered around North America. Meanwhile, SpaceX competes against entire nations in the market to send up satellites and resupply the International Space Station. 
In the case of the Hyperloop, Musk started focusing on public transportation after he grew disenchanted with the plans for California’s high-speed rail system. Construction on the highly political, $70 billion project is meant to begin in earnest this year, with plans to link cities from San Diego to Sacramento by 2029. “You have to look at what they say it will cost vs. the actual final costs, and I think it’s safe to say you’re talking about a $100 billion-plus train,” Musk says, adding that the train is too slow and a horrendous land rights mess.

inothernews:

Via Bloomberg Businessweek:

Almost a year after Elon Musk, chief executive of Tesla Motors (TSLA) and SpaceX, first floated the idea of a superfast mode of transportation, he has finally revealed the details: a solar-powered, city-to-city elevated transit system that could take passengers and cars from Los Angeles to San Francisco in 30 minutes.  In typical Musk fashion, the Hyperloop, as he calls it, immediately poses a challenge to the status quo—in this case, California’s $70 billion high-speed train that has been knocked by Musk and others as too expensive, too slow, and too impractical.

In Musk’s vision, the Hyperloop would transport people via aluminum pods enclosed inside of steel tubes.  He describes the design as looking like a shotgun with the tubes running side by side for most of the journey and closing the loop at either end. These tubes would be mounted on columns 50 to 100 yards apart, and the pods inside would travel up to 800 miles per hour. Some of this Musk has hinted at before; he now adds that pods could ferry cars as well as people. “You just drive on, and the pod departs,” Musk told Bloomberg Businessweek in his first interview about the Hyperloop.

… Musk has built his entrepreneurial career attacking businesses he deems inefficient or uninspiring. He co-founded PayPal in a bid to shake up the banking industry, then used the fortune he made selling the startup to eBay to fund equally ambitious efforts in transportation. Tesla Motors, for example, has created the highest-performing, highest-rated all-electric car and a complementary network of charging stations scattered around North America. Meanwhile, SpaceX competes against entire nations in the market to send up satellites and resupply the International Space Station.

In the case of the Hyperloop, Musk started focusing on public transportation after he grew disenchanted with the plans for California’s high-speed rail system. Construction on the highly political, $70 billion project is meant to begin in earnest this year, with plans to link cities from San Diego to Sacramento by 2029. “You have to look at what they say it will cost vs. the actual final costs, and I think it’s safe to say you’re talking about a $100 billion-plus train,” Musk says, adding that the train is too slow and a horrendous land rights mess.

posted on 13.08.12

eye-you:

frank lloyd wright’s hollyhock house, 1921 
(aline barnsdall residence)
living room + fireplace  
4800 hollywood boulevard
photos by marvin rand, 1965

via: decaying hollywood mansions 

posted on 13.08.03

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