arciphilia:

assvssin:

i want to live here. like bad.

(via
TumbleOn)

arciphilia:

assvssin:

i want to live here. like bad.

(via

posted on 13.06.07

victortsu:

a wall by wang shu, who, I just learned, practices ‘slow building’, in china. he recycles the buildings that demolished in china’s feverish construction phase to build new buildings. 
Sans_Titre_69 (by Clément Guillaume)

victortsu:

a wall by wang shu, who, I just learned, practices ‘slow building’, in china. he recycles the buildings that demolished in china’s feverish construction phase to build new buildings. 

Sans_Titre_69 (by Clément Guillaume)

posted on 12.08.03

smartercities:

Vertical vegetable garden planted on the side of your house in repurposed rain gutters
via How does your garden grow? A different way to plant vegetables
Submitted by Anna C.
via urbangreens:

smartercities:

Vertical vegetable garden planted on the side of your house in repurposed rain gutters

via How does your garden grow? A different way to plant vegetables

Submitted by Anna C.

via urbangreens:

posted on 12.01.20

mhel02:

Recycled Materials Cottage by Juan Luis Martinez Nahuel in Chile- outside

mhel02:

Recycled Materials Cottage by Juan Luis Martinez Nahuel in Chile- outside

posted on 12.01.06

lizmcbride:

unconsumption:

Hard Plastic Bottles, Reborn as a Bridge

The town of York, Me., is putting up what could be a bridge to a better future, not because of it where it goes but because of what it is made of: plastic.
Plastic bottles have been the bane of landfills for decades because they do not degrade. To find other uses for these strong and persistent materials, some manufacturers have melted them into boards for beach house decks or spun them into clothing materials.
But while plastics recycling has become more common since the 1980s, far more could be done, environmental policy makers say. The nation recycles only 27.5 percent of its hard plastic bottle waste, versus 71 percent of its newspapers and 67 percent of its steel cans, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2010 figures.
Now comes Axion International, a New Jersey-based company founded in 2007 that has developed a process to make a building material that is strong enough to supplant steel and concrete but is made out of discarded laundry detergent containers and milk cartons. 

Such plastic building material also could be fabricated into railroad ties, sound barriers along highways, and I-beams, among other uses. In most cases, “the product costs a little less than steel and concrete.”
(via Hard Plastic Bottles, Reborn as a Bridge - NYTimes.com)

Cool!

lizmcbride:

unconsumption:

Hard Plastic Bottles, Reborn as a Bridge

The town of York, Me., is putting up what could be a bridge to a better future, not because of it where it goes but because of what it is made of: plastic.

Plastic bottles have been the bane of landfills for decades because they do not degrade. To find other uses for these strong and persistent materials, some manufacturers have melted them into boards for beach house decks or spun them into clothing materials.

But while plastics recycling has become more common since the 1980s, far more could be done, environmental policy makers say. The nation recycles only 27.5 percent of its hard plastic bottle waste, versus 71 percent of its newspapers and 67 percent of its steel cans, according to the Environmental Protection Agency’s 2010 figures.

Now comes Axion International, a New Jersey-based company founded in 2007 that has developed a process to make a building material that is strong enough to supplant steel and concrete but is made out of discarded laundry detergent containers and milk cartons. 

Such plastic building material also could be fabricated into railroad ties, sound barriers along highways, and I-beams, among other uses. In most cases, “the product costs a little less than steel and concrete.”

(via Hard Plastic Bottles, Reborn as a Bridge - NYTimes.com)

Cool!

posted on 12.01.03

sustainable-sam:

jenplaysoutside:

green-home:

Abandoned Fishing Boats Transformed Into Beautiful Sheds
 In an incredible example of adaptive reuse, resourceful fishermen on Holy Island in the UK have transformed these retired wooden fishing vessels into stunning storage sheds.

Oh this is so cool.
Things to also live in : an upside down boat. 

sustainable-sam:

jenplaysoutside:

green-home:

Abandoned Fishing Boats Transformed Into Beautiful Sheds

 In an incredible example of adaptive reuse, resourceful fishermen on Holy Island in the UK have transformed these retired wooden fishing vessels into stunning storage sheds.

Oh this is so cool.

Things to also live in : an upside down boat. 

posted on 12.01.03

mothernaturenetwork:

If Hoyoung Lee’s concept printer becomes reality, you’ll never throw away another pencil stub and never buy another ink cartridge. The pencil printer separates the wood from pencils and uses the lead to print documents. There’s even a built-in eraser component that allows you to remove text from a page and reuse the paper, so you’ll be saving money and trees.15 bizarre — but cool — green inventions

mothernaturenetwork:

If Hoyoung Lee’s concept printer becomes reality, you’ll never throw away another pencil stub and never buy another ink cartridge. The pencil printer separates the wood from pencils and uses the lead to print documents. There’s even a built-in eraser component that allows you to remove text from a page and reuse the paper, so you’ll be saving money and trees.
15 bizarre — but cool — green inventions

posted on 11.11.27

plantsaretakingover:

mildly terrifying but fabulous aquaponics:
‘local river’ by duende studio / mathieu lehanneur.

plantsaretakingover:

mildly terrifying but fabulous aquaponics:

‘local river’ by duende studio / mathieu lehanneur.

posted on 11.11.05

mothernaturenetwork:

Your office will never waste paper again with Oriental’s White Goat machine, which converts normal paper into toilet paper. Simply insert about 40 sheets of paper, and in 30 minutes you’ll receive a freshly made roll of toilet paper. The machine shreds the paper, dissolves it in water, thins it out and then dries it and winds it around a roll. According to Oriental, it costs about 12 cents to churn out one roll.15 bizarre (but awesome) green inventions

mothernaturenetwork:

Your office will never waste paper again with Oriental’s White Goat machine, which converts normal paper into toilet paper. Simply insert about 40 sheets of paper, and in 30 minutes you’ll receive a freshly made roll of toilet paper. The machine shreds the paper, dissolves it in water, thins it out and then dries it and winds it around a roll. According to Oriental, it costs about 12 cents to churn out one roll.
15 bizarre (but awesome) green inventions

posted on 11.11.05

archiphile:

bridges: modern village in the calabria bridge by off architecture in italy
displayed on archiphile | facebook | twitter

archiphile:

bridges: modern village in the calabria bridge by off architecture in italy

displayed on archiphile | facebook | twitter

posted on 11.05.14

sustainable-sam:

alexanderpf:

Earthships sound like they might just beam us beyond our current laws of reality,  and they delightfully look like it too. Architect Mike Reynolds has been  developing his Earthships for decades, traveling from their base in  Taos, New Mexico to Haiti, China, and even the Lower East Side of  Manhattan.
An Earthship derives its electricity from  the sun and wind, its water from rain and snow, and its temperature  regulation from the earth. An internal sewage treatment system means  each drop of water is used four times, feeding lush wetlands of flowers  and vegetables. The walls are literally made of trash: tires filled with  dirt, glorious stained glass windows of old beer bottles. It doesn’t  get much more radically self-sustainable than this, folks.
via unconsumption More: Hitching a Ride on an Earthship :: Etsy Blog

Jeffrey prefers the layout of these compared to just a little cob house, which is fine by me, they make so much more sense, and we can have a good yield of food indoors as well. I prefer the idea of having one long house instead of a few smaller buildings which is something we’ve also been looking at. No rush, we have to work on getting that land first :) 

sustainable-sam:

alexanderpf:

Earthships sound like they might just beam us beyond our current laws of reality, and they delightfully look like it too. Architect Mike Reynolds has been developing his Earthships for decades, traveling from their base in Taos, New Mexico to Haiti, China, and even the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

An Earthship derives its electricity from the sun and wind, its water from rain and snow, and its temperature regulation from the earth. An internal sewage treatment system means each drop of water is used four times, feeding lush wetlands of flowers and vegetables. The walls are literally made of trash: tires filled with dirt, glorious stained glass windows of old beer bottles. It doesn’t get much more radically self-sustainable than this, folks.

via unconsumption More: Hitching a Ride on an Earthship :: Etsy Blog

Jeffrey prefers the layout of these compared to just a little cob house, which is fine by me, they make so much more sense, and we can have a good yield of food indoors as well. I prefer the idea of having one long house instead of a few smaller buildings which is something we’ve also been looking at. No rush, we have to work on getting that land first :) 

posted on 11.05.06

subtilitas:

Ontwerpgroep Trude Hooykaas - Kraanspoor office building, built on top of an abandoned crane-way in Amsterdam, completed in 2008.

subtilitas:

Ontwerpgroep Trude Hooykaas - Kraanspoor office building, built on top of an abandoned crane-way in Amsterdam, completed in 2008.

posted on 11.04.09

weffy:

makdreams:

streetlightlullaby:

A Rebirth: Re-bent Rebar
Steel rebar has long been used to increase the structural integrity of concrete in all types of construction applications.  Groves-Raines Architects in the UK decided to try using rebar in a whole new method and found the results quite pleasing.  They weaved the long strands of steel together into a containment wall and shed for a composting garden.  Hit the link to check out more photos.
home design find via Core 77

weffy:

makdreams:

streetlightlullaby:

A Rebirth: Re-bent Rebar

Steel rebar has long been used to increase the structural integrity of concrete in all types of construction applications.  Groves-Raines Architects in the UK decided to try using rebar in a whole new method and found the results quite pleasing.  They weaved the long strands of steel together into a containment wall and shed for a composting garden.  Hit the link to check out more photos.

home design find via Core 77

posted on 11.02.15

25-Year Refab: Concrete Factory Converted to Castle Home

Over a quarter of a century ago, an architect stumbled upon the half-ruined remains of an old cement factory. The grounds contained dozens of silos, vast subterranean spaces and long-silent manufacturing equipment

Decades later, the results of his ongoing renovation project are beyond remarkable. The complex now houses its re-designer, Gothic-influenced Spanish architect Ricardo Bofill, serving as his primary residence.

Layers of lush greenery – ivy, cypress, eucalyptus, palm and olive trees – have been slowly added (and subsequently grown) throughout this piece-by-piece remodel, giving the exterior grounds new life as well as the interior areas.

Also, I do believe the architect is married to Paulina Rubio, and that the house was featured on cribs:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rI8N9w1e0ug


(Source: dornob.com)

posted on 11.02.11

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