yama-bato:

Laura Gilpin (1891–1979)  Steps of the Castillo, Chichen Itza, 1932

yama-bato:

Laura Gilpin (1891–1979)
Steps of the Castillo, Chichen Itza, 1932

posted on 14.02.17

life1nmotion:

Unparalleled Laurel Way Residence by Whipple Russell Architects

life1nmotion:

Unparalleled Laurel Way Residence by Whipple Russell Architects

posted on 14.01.04

remash:

center for boy scouts of america ~ mithun

posted on 13.11.20

life1nmotion:

From the street, this 2012 renovation by Personal Architecture cannot be distinguished from its neighbors in the Hague, The Netherlands.

life1nmotion:

From the street, this 2012 renovation by Personal Architecture cannot be distinguished from its neighbors in the Hague, The Netherlands.

posted on 13.11.10

luxurymoney:

luxurymoney|Source|More

posted on 13.10.04

mpdrolet:

Benjamin Schmuck

posted on 13.09.18

posted on 13.09.03

urbanination:

The Cascade stairwell seating in Hong Kong.

urbanination:

The Cascade stairwell seating in Hong Kong.

posted on 13.09.02

studioentropia:

Estádio Municipal de Braga, Abril Doismileonze

studioentropia:

Estádio Municipal de Braga, Abril Doismileonze

posted on 13.08.22

lemanoosh:

By Stephane Beel

posted on 13.08.08

posted on 13.07.10

arciphilia:

assvssin:

i want to live here. like bad.

(via
TumbleOn)

arciphilia:

assvssin:

i want to live here. like bad.

(via

posted on 13.06.07

posted on 13.05.16

nickkahler:

M. C. Escher, Ascending and Descending, Lithograph print, 1960
“The Penrose stair is an impossible object created by Lionel Penrose and his son Roger Penrose. It can be seen as a variation on the Penrose triangle. It is a two-dimensional depiction of a staircase in which the stairs make four 90-degree turns as they ascend or descend yet form a continuous loop, so that a person could climb them forever and never get any higher. This is clearly impossible in three dimensions; the two-dimensional figure achieves this paradox by distorting perspective. The best known example of Penrose stairs appears in the lithograph Ascending and Descending by M. C. Escher, where it is incorporated into a monastery where several monks ascend and descend the endless staircase. The staircase had also been discovered previously by the Swedish artist Oscar Reutersvärd, but neither Penrose nor Escher were aware of his designs. In terms of sound, the Shepard tone is a similar illusion.”

nickkahler:

M. C. Escher, Ascending and Descending, Lithograph print, 1960

“The Penrose stair is an impossible object created by Lionel Penrose and his son Roger Penrose. It can be seen as a variation on the Penrose triangle. It is a two-dimensional depiction of a staircase in which the stairs make four 90-degree turns as they ascend or descend yet form a continuous loop, so that a person could climb them forever and never get any higher. This is clearly impossible in three dimensions; the two-dimensional figure achieves this paradox by distorting perspective. The best known example of Penrose stairs appears in the lithograph Ascending and Descending by M. C. Escher, where it is incorporated into a monastery where several monks ascend and descend the endless staircase. The staircase had also been discovered previously by the Swedish artist Oscar Reutersvärd, but neither Penrose nor Escher were aware of his designs. In terms of sound, the Shepard tone is a similar illusion.”

posted on 13.04.11

(Source: justthedesign)

posted on 13.04.03

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