ryanpanos:

Inhabiting Infrastructures: Indian Stepwells | Socks Studio

The stepwells are generally storage and irrigation tanks in which sets of steps must be descended in order to reach for water and maintain the well itself. These structures are mostly common in western India and in arid regions of South Asia where they provide regular supply in regions affected by heavy seasonal fluctuations in water availability.

The stepwells, (the erliest date to 600 AD), essentially appear as infrastructural monuments for water collection, huge artifacts somewhere between landscape and architecture sunken in the earth. They are usually composed of two constant elements, a well and an access route: the well collects monsoon rain percolating through layers of fine silt (to filter particulates), eventually reaching a layer of impermeable clay. The second elements, the staircases, are descended to reach water and allow the use of the infrastructure. There are no two identical stepwells, as each one of them, – about 3000 were built -, reveals specific features in the shape and in the decorative motives; in some cases the stepwells host galleries and chambers around the well.

posted on 14.03.13

landscapearchitecture:

"The Stump Jump Flood House – if it floods, it floats."
Read more at: http://floodofideas.org.au/the-stump-jump-flood-house/

landscapearchitecture:

"The Stump Jump Flood House – if it floods, it floats."

Read more at: http://floodofideas.org.au/the-stump-jump-flood-house/

posted on 13.11.24

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Most Beautiful Wastewater Treatment Plant
by Chris Tackett
Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.
This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building.
The Omega Center for Sustainable Living may be the most beautiful wastewater treatment plant in the world. It is powered by solar and geothermal power, so it requires no additional power to operate. Unlike other wastewater treatment plants, the OCSL does not use chemicals to treat the water, but rather mimics the processes of the nature world, such as using a combination of microorganisms, algae, plants and gravel and sand filtration to clean sewage water and return clean drinkable water back to the aquifer.
In addition to doing all of this, the OCSL also functions as a classroom, to help educate and inspire people about the power of nature to provide solutions…
(read more: TreeHugger)
photograph by Omega Center for Sustainable Living

rhamphotheca:

The World’s Most Beautiful Wastewater Treatment Plant

by Chris Tackett

Let this wastewater treatment plant show you how to live.

This may sound crazy, but it is exactly why the Omega Institute for Holistic Studies in Rhinebeck, New York constructed their Omega Center for Sustainable Living (OCSL), also known as the Eco Machine. We can learn some valuable lessons from this building.

The Omega Center for Sustainable Living may be the most beautiful wastewater treatment plant in the world. It is powered by solar and geothermal power, so it requires no additional power to operate. Unlike other wastewater treatment plants, the OCSL does not use chemicals to treat the water, but rather mimics the processes of the nature world, such as using a combination of microorganisms, algae, plants and gravel and sand filtration to clean sewage water and return clean drinkable water back to the aquifer.

In addition to doing all of this, the OCSL also functions as a classroom, to help educate and inspire people about the power of nature to provide solutions…

(read more: TreeHugger)

photograph by Omega Center for Sustainable Living

posted on 13.10.11

(Source: malformalady)

posted on 13.07.14

2headedsnake:

mikeworrall.com
Mike Worrall, Sculling the Forest, oil on panel, 92x122cm, 1991

2headedsnake:

mikeworrall.com

Mike Worrall, Sculling the Forest, oil on panel, 92x122cm, 1991

posted on 13.07.02

(Source: architizer.com)

posted on 13.05.05

razorshapes:

Ran Ortner - Oil on Canvas

posted on 13.04.14

engineeringisawesome:

19-Year-Old Student Develops Ocean Cleanup Array That Could Remove 7,250,000 Tons Of Plastic From the World’s Oceans

19-year-old Boyan Slat has unveiled plans to create an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans. The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Instead of moving through the ocean, the array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel. The angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from plankton, filtered and stored for recycling.

Inhabitat

engineeringisawesome:

19-Year-Old Student Develops Ocean Cleanup Array That Could Remove 7,250,000 Tons Of Plastic From the World’s Oceans

19-year-old Boyan Slat has unveiled plans to create an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans. The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Instead of moving through the ocean, the array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel. The angle of the booms would force plastic in the direction of the platforms, where it would be separated from plankton, filtered and stored for recycling.

Inhabitat

posted on 13.03.27

uniqueshomedesign:

Unique Underwater hotel in charisma design

uniqueshomedesign:

Unique Underwater hotel in charisma design

posted on 13.03.18

carex:

Designed by Thomas Hoblyn for the 2011 RHS Chelsea Flower Show.Read a blogger’s review of the entire garden here:http://www.hegartywebberpartnership.com/the-homebase-cornish-memories-garden/

carex:

Designed by Thomas Hoblyn for the 2011 RHS Chelsea Flower Show.

Read a blogger’s review of the entire garden here:http://www.hegartywebberpartnership.com/the-homebase-cornish-memories-garden/

posted on 12.11.24

catrinastewart:

Ma-Adan - Iraq

 The marsh dwellers have populated the Edenic wetlands for almost 5000 years. They were an almost completely self sufficient community with the marshes producing everything they needed to survive. Sturdy reeds reaching 20 feet became raw material for homes, baskets and boats, while tender reed shoots provided plentiful forage for water buffalo, who provided milk and dung, used as fuel for fires.

The marsh-dwelling people who in the 1950’s numbered about half a million people, have now dwindled to as few as 20,000 in Iraq. The Edenic wetlands that once gave refuge to a rich variety of wildlife have become lifeless, nearly waterless, salt-encrusted mudflats, since Saddam ordered the water source to be cut off just before he lost power. Today the Eden Again Project is attempting to release water back into the marshes, with the hope that the communities will return to their original site. 


posted on 12.06.29

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